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New England Local News and Breaking News

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    A popular snack treat is being recalled nationwide over potential salmonella concerns.

    Swiss Rolls, sold under a variety of brand names including H-E-B and Great Value, are being voluntarily recalled by the manufacturer over the possible presence of salmonella in one of the treat’s ingredients.

    Mrs. Freshley’s, Food Lion, H-E-B, Baker’s Treat, Market Square, and Great Value brands are all impacted by the recall nationally, and several southern states are impacted under the Captain John Derst’s Hold Fashioned Bread brand name.

    Salmonella can cause serious, or even fatal, infections in young children and the elderly. No human cases have yet been reported in connection with the recall.

    For a full list of brand names, UPC label numbers, and Best By Dates, you can visit the Flowers Foods website, or use this list: 

    Mrs. Freshleys -4 count/7.2 ounces 
    UPC: 072250011907 
    Best By Dates: Through 10/19/18 

    Mrs. Freshley's - 6 count/12 ounces 
    UPC: 072250903233 
    Best By Dates:Through 10/14/18

    Food Lion - 6 count/13 ounces
    UPC: 035826092779
    Best By Dates:10/16/18

    H-E-B: 6 count/12 ounces 
    UPC: 041220296483
    Best By Dates:09/19/18

    Baker's Treat:6 count/13 ounces 
    UPC: 041498188382
    Best By Dates:9/21/18 through 9/28/18

    Market Square:6 count/12 ounces 
    UPC: 087381760556
    Best By Dates: 309 8194 B

    Great Value: 6 count/13 ounces 
    UPC: 078742147550
    Best By Dates: 9/17/18 through 9/25/18

    Captain John Derst's Old Fashioned Bread
    UPC: 071316001180
    Best By Dates: 7/16/18 through 7/28/18



    Photo Credit: Walmart

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    Snack food company Utz has recalled select bags of potato chips because of an undeclared soy allergen.

    Utz Quality Foods has issued a voluntarily recall on select 2.875 oz. and 7.5 oz bags of Utz Carolina Style Barbeque Potato Chips after learning some packages were mislabeled. The recall affects products distributed in 30 states including Connecticut, D.C., Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont and Virginia, as well as D.C.

    No illnesses have been reported, according to the Food and Drug Administration website, but people who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to soy run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume the chips.

    Utz urged customers not to eat the chips and either throw them out or return them to the store for a full refund. The company suggested retailers check their shelves and confirm the products are not available for purchase.

    The affected 2.875 oz. bags include a UPC code of 0-41780-00153-5 and an expiration date between Oct. 6 and Oct. 20. The affected 7.5 oz. bags include a UPC code of 0-41780-00049-1 and expiration dates between Aug. 18 and Oct. 27.

    For more information, email customerservice@utzsnacks.com or call 1-800-367-7629, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET.



    Photo Credit: FDA

    Utz recalled select bags of its Carolina Style Barbeque Potato Chips because of an undeclared soy allergen.Utz recalled select bags of its Carolina Style Barbeque Potato Chips because of an undeclared soy allergen.

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    Ninety people in 26 states have been infected with salmonella in the midst of an outbreak that has been connected to raw turkey products, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

    There haven’t been any reported deaths, but 40 people have been hospitalized.

    Salmonella cases have been reported in Alaska, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin, the CDC said in a news release.

    While the outbreak hasn’t been linked to a single supplier, the salmonella strain has been found in samples of raw turkey products including pet food and live turkeys, the CDC said.

    The agency hasn’t instructed retailers to stop selling raw turkey products and hasn’t told consumers to stop eating properly cooked turkey products.

    To avoid being infected with salmonella, the CDC recommends frequently washing your hands, cooking raw turkey thoroughly and avoiding raw diets for pets.

    “Always handle raw turkey carefully and cook it thoroughly to prevent food poisoning,” the CDC said in the release. “This outbreak is a reminder that raw turkey products can have germs that spread around food preparation areas and can make you sick.”



    Photo Credit: Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images, File

    In this Oct. 5, 2014, file photo, a podium with the logo for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is displayed at the Tom Harkin Global Communications Center in Atlanta.In this Oct. 5, 2014, file photo, a podium with the logo for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is displayed at the Tom Harkin Global Communications Center in Atlanta.

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    More than a dozen Ritz cracker sandwiches and Ritz Bits products have been recalled due to a possible salmonella contamination, Mondelez Global LLC said.

    The New Jersey-based company has recalled sixteen products — including Ritz Cheese Cracker Sandwiches and Ritz Bits Cheese — in the U.S., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands because the whey powder they’re made with could contain salmonella, it said.

    Mondelez hasn’t received any reports of people falling ill after eating these products yet, but consumers who have purchased them should throw them out, the company noted.

    A full list of the products included in the recall can be found on Mondelez’ website.

    “Salmonella is a microorganism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems,” Mondelez said in a release.

    Symptoms can include fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and stomach pain, the company said.



    Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images, File

    In this July 1, 2003, file photo, Ritz crackers are displayed on a store shelf in Miami, Florida.In this July 1, 2003, file photo, Ritz crackers are displayed on a store shelf in Miami, Florida.

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    Pepperidge Farm says it has been notified by one of its ingredient suppliers that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of salmonella.

    Pepperidge Farm initiated an investigation and, out of an abundance of caution, is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers. The products were distributed throughout the United States. 

    No illnesses have been reported. No other Pepperidge Farm products in the U.S. are subject to this recall.

    The following four varieties with the indicated codes are subject to this recall:

    • Flavor Blasted® Xtra Cheddar
    • Flavor Blasted® Sour Cream & Onion
    • Goldfish® Baked with Whole Grain Xtra Cheddar
    • Goldfish® Mix Xtra Cheddar + Pretzel

    Different packaging options are included in this recall. Consumers are encouraged to read this chart.

    Consumers who have purchased these products should not eat them. Recalled products should be discarded or may be returned to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may visit www.pepperidgefarm.com/GoldfishUpdate or call Customer Service at 800-679-1791, 24 hours a day, for more information.



    Photo Credit: Pepperidge Farm

    Pepperidge Farm is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers after it was notified that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of Salmonella.Pepperidge Farm is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers after it was notified that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of Salmonella.

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    The Kraft Heinz Company is recalling about 59,000 jars of its Taco Bell Salsa Con Queso Mild Cheese Dip that could potentially lead to botulism if eaten.

    Kraft is voluntarily recalling 15-ounce glass jars with "best when used by" dates of Dec. 27, 2018, and Jan. 23, 2019. The affected items are showing signs of product separation, which can allow for the growth of the bacteria that causes botulism, the company said on its website.

    Botulism is rare but can be fatal, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The illness can cause difficulty breathing and muscle paralysis. Symptoms include blurred or double vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, a thick-feeling tongue, dry mouth and muscle weakness.

    Kraft said there have been no complaints or reports of illness related to the products. The company said it is working with the Food and Drug Administration.

    The affected items were produced and distributed by Kraft in the U.S. The company urged customers not to eat the dip and return it to the store for an exchange or refund.



    Photo Credit: Kraft Heinz Company

    Kraft Heinz Company recalled certain 15-ounce jars of its Taco Bell Salsa Con Queso Mild Cheese Dip over a risk of botulism.Kraft Heinz Company recalled certain 15-ounce jars of its Taco Bell Salsa Con Queso Mild Cheese Dip over a risk of botulism.

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    Pepperidge Farm says it has been notified by one of its ingredient suppliers that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of salmonella.

    Pepperidge Farm initiated an investigation and, out of an abundance of caution, is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers. The products were distributed throughout the United States. 

    No illnesses have been reported. No other Pepperidge Farm products in the U.S. are subject to this recall.

    The following four varieties with the indicated codes are subject to this recall:

    • Flavor Blasted® Xtra Cheddar
    • Flavor Blasted® Sour Cream & Onion
    • Goldfish® Baked with Whole Grain Xtra Cheddar
    • Goldfish® Mix Xtra Cheddar + Pretzel

    Different packaging options are included in this recall. Consumers are encouraged to read this chart.

    Consumers who have purchased these products should not eat them. Recalled products should be discarded or may be returned to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may visit www.pepperidgefarm.com/GoldfishUpdate or call Customer Service at 800-679-1791, 24 hours a day, for more information.



    Photo Credit: Pepperidge Farm

    Pepperidge Farm is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers after it was notified that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of Salmonella.Pepperidge Farm is voluntarily recalling four varieties of Goldfish crackers after it was notified that whey powder in a seasoning that is applied to four varieties of crackers has been the subject of a recall by the whey powder manufacturer due to the potential presence of Salmonella.

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    Bill Marler arrived at his Seattle home one night this week and began searching through the cupboard for something to eat. Toward the back, the food poisoning attorney spotted a bag of Goldfish, then remembered news reports about a new recall. Sure enough, he owned one of the more than 3 million packages that had been recalled on Monday. 

    The back-to-back recalls of household staples Goldfish and Ritz crackers, along with earlier recalls of the Kellogg's cereal Honey Smacks and other cases, have prompted social media users to question which snacks are safe to eat. The short answer: we don't know yet, though no one has fallen ill from consuming recently recalled snack products linked to one supplier of whey protein.

    Pepperidge Farm issued its voluntary recall for four types of its Goldfish crackers after the whey powder manufacturer Associated Milk Producers Inc. (AMPI) announced a recall of its own due to the “possible presence” of salmonella. Another company, Mondelez, recalled several of its Ritz cracker products over the weekend for the same reason.

    Last week, Flowers Foods recalled its Swiss Rolls sold under various brand names. The company mentioned the whey powder ingredient in a news release. A Hungry Man frozen dinner also used AMPI's recalled powder. 

    AMPI spokeswoman Sarah Schmidt noted that "all products shipped into the marketplace tested negative for Salmonella as part of AMPI’s routine testing program.”

    But because "additional product tested positive for Salmonella under AMPI’s routine test and hold procedures," the recall was a precautionary move. 

    "At AMPI, we are dedicated to producing dairy products that meet the highest quality and safety standards," Schmidt said. "We will continue to work cooperatively with the FDA." 

    In a high-profile recall not linked to AMPI, Kellogg's flagged Honey Smacks last month due to the possible presence of salmonella. Seventy-three people became ill after eating the cereal, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Whey powder isn't an ingredient in Honey Smacks, Kellogg's said in an email to NBC. 

    Marler, who represents some of the people who fell ill from salmonella after consuming Honey Smacks, said companies that alert customers before anyone gets sick have adopted the best approach to managing the issue.

    With Ritz, Goldfish, Swiss Rolls and Hungry Man — products the FDA has linked to AMPI — there haven’t been any reported illnesses. Other manufacturers who use AMPI's whey powder might begin issuing recalls in the coming days, Marler predicted, based on how past recalls have played out. 

    "I would expect it to be potentially dozens of products," Marler said. "This kind of recall is the system working properly. It's common and actually a good thing."

    Here's how the system operates: ingredient and product testing is not regulated or required by the government. Companies often test their products according to their own food safety plans, said Martin Bucknavage, a senior food safety associate at Penn State’s college of agricultural sciences.

    When an ingredient supplier identifies possible contamination, it contacts the manufacturers it works with. The supplier also files a report with the FDA explaining the recall using the agency's reportable food registry portal.  

    In AMPI's case, the powder they provide for dairy and baked products is also a common ingredient used to coat cereals and other snacks, said Randy Worobo, a professor in Cornell’s department of food science. 

    AMPI declined to release its complete list of whey powder customers,  confirming only that four manufacturers it works with have issued voluntary recalls as of Wednesday. It said it doesn't release proprietary customer lists.

    An FDA spokesman said the agency had the list but wouldn't provide it. NBC has filed a Freedom of Information Act request to determine which companies receive whey powder from AMPI. 

    Salmonella is a bacteria that causes 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths in the U.S. each year, according to the CDC. Food is the cause of 1 million of those illnesses and 380 deaths. 

    In 2007 and 2008, Peanut Corporation of America discovered salmonella contamination in its ingredients that were used in other manufacturers’ products but didn’t immediately issue a recall, according to The New York Times. Nine people were killed and more than 700 were reported ill as a result.

    Companies that issue voluntary recalls before anyone gets sick will likely be viewed by customers in a positive light, said Tom Meyvis, an NYU marketing professor who studies consumer behavior.

    “There’s an advantage to [the recall being connected] to one supplier,” Meyvis said.

    Marler, the food poisoning attorney in Seattle, said that between recalls for romaine lettuce and Del Monte vegetables and illnesses linked to McDonald’s salads, the number of food-related ailments this year is alarming.

    The FDA disputes that characterization. Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement that there haven't been an increase in the number or scope of recalls.

    "Our tools for detecting them are much better, and our policies for how and when we alert the public lean in the direction of more and earlier communication," Gottlieb said. 

    The FDA recommends that people discard or return recalled products to the stores where they're purchased. 



    Photo Credit: Pepperidge Farm/Getty Images/AMPI

    Recalls issued for some Goldfish and Ritz crackers might be connected to the same whey powder supplier.Recalls issued for some Goldfish and Ritz crackers might be connected to the same whey powder supplier.

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    The United States Department of Agriculture issued a nationwide public health alert for more than two dozen beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products distributed by Caito Foods LLC, three varieties of which are sold at Trader Joe's, due to concerns about contamination with Cyclospora. The parasite causes intestinal illness.

    Caito Foods was notified from their lettuce supplier, Fresh Express, that the chopped romaine used in some of the salads was being recalled, the USDA said.

    Trader Joe's identified its three products affected by the recall as Trader Joe's Tarragon Chicken Salad Wrap, Trader Giotto’s Caesar Salad with Chicken and Trader Ming’s Chinese Inspired Salad with Chicken with "Best By" dates of July 21, 2018, to July 23, 2018. The products were sold in stores spanning 11 states: Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio and Wisconsin. 

    Products that were distributed by Gordon Food Service or sold at Kroger and Walgreens were also listed in the recall notice.

    A Gordon Food Service representative said that its product — a roast beef wrap, chicken Caesar salad and Santa Fe chicken salad — was sent to a customer in Ohio, who has been notified about the recall. 

    Walgreens' affected product — an Asian chicken salad, chicken Caesar and chef salad with ham and turkey — was available "in a limited number of our stores in Illinois only," a spokesperson said. "Upon learning of the recall, we notified these stores to immediately pull and dispose of any product on store shelves."

    NBC has also reached out to Kroger for more information about which states their product linked to the Caito recall were sold in. 

    The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service stated that the potentially contaminated items were produced between July 15 and July 18 with either "Best By" or "Enjoy By" dates ranging from July 18 to July 23, 2018. The full public health alert issued by FSIS can be read here.

    Consumers should throw any of the affected items away. 

    Copyright Associated Press / NECN


    A file photo of romaine lettuce.A file photo of romaine lettuce.

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    HP Hood is recalling more than 145,000 half-gallon cartons of refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almond milk because the products may contain milk – an allergen not listed on the label — according to the Food and Drug Administration

    The company says the product is safe to drink unless consumers have a milk allergy or sensitivity. So far, there has only been one report of an allergic reaction to the product.

    Almond milk is made with filtered water and almonds, among other ingredients

    The products were shipped to retailers and wholesalers in a number of states including Connecticut, New York, Virginia, Florida, Texas, Illinois, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Michigan, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Nebraska, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Wisconsin. 

    The recall applies to products with a use-by date of September 2, 2018. 

    The stamped information to identify affected products is: 

    • USE BY: SEP 02 18 (07:36 – 20:48) H5 L1 51-4109
    • USE BY: SEP 02 18 (07:36 – 20:48) H5 L2 51-4109
    • USE BY: SEP 02 18 (07:36 – 20:48) H6 L1 51-4109
    • USE BY: SEP 02 18 (07:36 – 20:48) H6 L2 51-4109

    Additionally, products have a UPC bar code of 41570 05621 on the carton's side panel. 

    Consumers can return affected containers to the store where it was purchased for a full refund or exchange. A web form can also be completed on the company's website



    Photo Credit: Food and Drug Administration

    This photo, provided by the Food and Drug Administration, shows the use-by date for a container of Vanilla Almond Breeze almondmilk. Hood has voluntarily recalled more than 145,000 containers of refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almondmilk because the products may contain milk, an allergen that is not listed on the label.This photo, provided by the Food and Drug Administration, shows the use-by date for a container of Vanilla Almond Breeze almondmilk. Hood has voluntarily recalled more than 145,000 containers of refrigerated Vanilla Almond Breeze almondmilk because the products may contain milk, an allergen that is not listed on the label.

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded its voluntary recall of several medications used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure over concerns that an active ingredient in the drugs could be contaminated with a cancer-causing agent.

    The agency reported that traces of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a "probable human carcinogen," was found in the active ingredient valsartan in the recalled products. The FDA noted not all products containing valsartan are contaminated and being recalled. A third-party supplied the valsartan contained in the recall. 

    The FDA updated the list of products included in the recall and the list of those unaffected

    "FDA is working with drug manufacturers to ensure future valsartan active pharmaceutical ingredients are not at risk of NDMA formation," the FDA said. "The agency reminds manufacturers to thoroughly evaluate their API manufacturing processes, and changes to those processes, to detect any unsafe impurities."

    Patients are urged to look at the drug name and company name on the label of their prescription bottle to determine whether a specific product has been recalled. If the information is not on the bottle, patients should contact the pharmacy that dispensed the medicine to find out the company name.

    If a patient is taking one of the recalled medicines, they should follow the recall instructions each specific company provided, which will be available on the FDA’s website.

    If a patient's medicine is included in the recall, they should contact their health care professional to discuss their treatment options, which may include another valsartan product this recall doesn't affect or an alternative option.

    The agency encourages patients and health care professionals to report any adverse reaction to the FDA’s MedWatch program.

    "The FDA’s review is ongoing and has included investigating the levels of NDMA in the recalled products, assessing the possible effect on patients who have been taking them and what measures can be taken to reduce or eliminate the impurity from future batches produced by the company," the FDA said in a news release.

    The presence of NDMA is "thought to be related to changes in the way the active substance was manufactured," the agency said.



    Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

    File photo of a doctor reading a blood pressure gauge during an examination of a patient.File photo of a doctor reading a blood pressure gauge during an examination of a patient.

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    Certain bottles of CVS Health’s 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist have been recalled after they were found to have had a microbiological contamination, the Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday.

    The nasal mist, manufactured by Product Quest, was found to have Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Frequent use of the contaminated product could result in infections, which could be life-threatening for users with cystic fibrosis or people who are immuno-compromised, the FDA said on its website.

    "To the best of Product Quest’s knowledge, the company has not received any reports of adverse events related to this recall," the FDA said.

    The affected nasal sprays come in .5-ounce white bottles. They are packaged in a carton with expiration date September 2019 and lot number 173089J printed on the side. The products have orange labels with “Sinus Relief” in white letters and “CVS Health” in the left corner.

    The FDA urges customers with the recalled product to return it to the store where it was purchased or to discard it.



    Photo Credit: Food and Drug Administration

    Certain CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist packages were recalled Wednesday due to contamination.Certain CVS Health 12 Hour Sinus Relief Nasal Mist packages were recalled Wednesday due to contamination.

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    The CDC is now reporting that 436 people have been diagnosed with an intestinal illness after consuming salads at McDonald’s restaurants. 

    The laboratory-confirmed cases of cyclosporiasis have been reported in 15 states after customers ate salads at the restaurant’s locations.

    In its initial announcement July 13, the CDC reported 61 cases. As of last week, there were 395 cases. 

    Over 200 cases have now been reported in Illinois and Iowa alone, with 219 cases confirmed in Illinois.  

    The most common symptom of the illness is watery diarrhea. Other symptoms include appetite loss, intestinal pain, nausea, and fatigue.

    McDonald's released a statement regarding the outbreak, saying "McDonald's is committed to the highest standards of food safety and quality control." 

    Earlier this summer, McDonald’s removed the lettuce blend from 3,000 identified restaurants and distribution centers that had received it.

    Affected restaurants were located in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Kentucky, West Virginia, and Missouri. 

    Reported illnesses started on or after May 20. 

    In an update Thursday, the CDC said "at this time, there is no evidence to suggest that this cluster of illnesses is related to the Cyclospora outbreak linked to Del Monte fresh produce vegetable trays."



    Photo Credit: AP

    This Feb. 15, 2018, file photo shows a McDonald's Restaurant in Brandon, Miss.This Feb. 15, 2018, file photo shows a McDonald's Restaurant in Brandon, Miss.

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